Q:

How does a lawyer get paid?

A:

There are two main ways that lawyers get paid: hourly rates and contingency fees. For personal injury cases, I work on a contingency fee basis (meaning you don’t pay me anything unless I recover money on your behalf). For employment law cases and employee benefit cases, I charge an hourly rate or contingency fee. We will need to discuss this based on your circumstances.

Q:

How long is my case going to take?

A:

The amount of time a case takes depends on multiple factors. For instance, if your employer and/or insurance company is willing to be reasonable, your case could take 3 to 6 months. If your case requires a more aggressive approach (i.e. litigation), it could take 18 to 24 months.

Q:

How much is this case worth?

A:

Honestly, I can’t give you a good answer to this question until I’ve reviewed all the evidence. The best way to get an accurate answer is to set up a case evaluation.

Q:

Do I have a strong case?

A:

Again, this is a common question that has a frustrating answer: it depends. Once I hear your side of the story and review the evidence, I will be able to give you a better answer as to whether you have a strong chance of winning your case.

Q:

How much is this going to cost me?

A:

If I’m working on a contingency fee basis for you, how much you receive will be based on the outcome of your case. If it’s an hourly case, we will discuss pricing after I’ve reviewed your case.

Q:

Is this going to affect my ability to find a new job?

A:

If a future employer retaliates against an employee who has asserted their right under fair employment laws, they can also be liable for retaliation. The litigation process is part of public life for U.S. citizens, large companies, and corporations. It is the right of an employee to invoke rights and not be retaliated against.